Anne of the Isles 

ANNE OF THE ISLES
by Paul Féval
adapted by Brian Stableford

cover by Anne-Claire Payet

Everyone trembled at the mere mention of the name of Anne of the Isles. The blood of Joël Braz the warlock ran in her veins. She was a priestess and a sorceress. Woe betide any man whose path crossed hers!

When Bretons tell stories, their tales have the Devil and Death for their main characters and graveyards and wind-swept, demon-haunted hills for their settings. The whistling of the tempest and the distant chimes of a tolling bell is always audible within them.The White Lady of the Marshes had avenged herself cruelly against the incredulous, they were well-advised never to entrust their boats to the current of the Oust once the north star had risen over the black trees of the Forêt-Neuve...

Two men dressed in long shrouds, as white as snow, were following the dog. When they passed in front of the Steward of Plougaz, the Moon lit their pale faces, their hollow cheeks and the orbits where there were no eyes...

Thank you, Belles-de-Nuit, gentle spirits that the mercy of God allows to wander in the poor by-ways of Brittany!

Anne of the Isles, last priestess of the Celtic Gods... The vengeful White Lady of the Marshes... The last fairies of mythical Lyonesse... Only Paul Féval, the author of Vampire City and Revenants could paint the epic Gothic fantasies of mist-shrouded, storm-beaten Ancient Brittany with so much color and flamboyance.

Contents:
- Anne des Iles (Anne of the Isles, 1842)
- La Femme Blanche des Marais (The White Lady of the Marshes, 1842)
- Le Joli Château (The Lovely Chateau, 1844)
- Les Belles-de-Nuit (1862)
by Paul Féval;
Introduction, Afterword and Notes by Brian Stableford.

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