The Apocryphal Napoleon

THE APOCRYPHAL NAPOLEON
by Louis Geoffroy
adapted by Brian Stableford

cover by Dimitri Rastorgoueff

The pyramid, in its full extent, as covered with white marble, and on the face that overlooked Paris was inscribed, in golden letters of prodigious dimension, a single word: NAPOLÉON.


The Apocryphal Napoléon (1836) by Louis Geoffroy, a French Magistrate, is celebrated as the first extended exercise in “alternate history.” In it, Napoleon succeeds in subduing Russia in 1812, invades England in 1814 and goes on to become the enlightened ruler of the world. The book details with great and methodical precision the conquest of the world by the French Emperor, and the technical and scientific achievements made by a united planet under Napoleon's leadership: electric-powered airships, weather control, flying cars, making sea water drinkable, and even the discovery of a new planet christened, Vulcan.


if read with an awareness of its historical context, The Apocryphal Napoléon reveals itself as a rich and profound work that still has a great deal to offer the contemporary reader, and still has a challenge to pose to ideas and ideals of social progress.

Contents:
Napoléon et la Conquête du Monde (1812-1832) [Napoleon And The Conquest Of The World] (Delloye, 1836; rev. as Napoléon Apocryphe, Paulin, 1841)
Introduction, Afterword and Notes by Brian Stableford.

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